Why We Have Chosen to Homeschool

I have posted before about how it is difficult to keep on fighting with the schools in order for my child to get the education he needs and deserves. Over the past year, we have all jumped through many very expensive hoops, having him tested by psychiatrists and psychologists to get an idea of how smart Caleb is and if his behavior can be calmed with medication.

Finally, a year later, and we know from the WISC that Caleb is beyond genius. While taking the test last year, Caleb refused to finish the test and he still got an amazing score. We also have him on medications that have helped Caleb even out – that said, by 6pm, he is nutsos again!

My husband, Caleb, and I all thought that with his NWEA and WISC scores that certainly now Caleb would be offered differentiated education. Nope. We got no help whatsoever. They just asked us to take more and more tests, which didn’t make sense since they had enough information from two years of tests to determine Caleb’s ability. I tried to reason with Shellie Cole, and then her boss, Dr. McDougal. Alas, neither of them were willing to teach Caleb math and reading at a 7th grade level. At some point, all three of us were exhausted and our nerves were fried.

Now, I will admit that having the day free sans Caleb is nice, but it isn’t as nice as having a happy child. After having such family drama last year, I learned a lot about myself. It turns out, I don’t really care if Caleb graduates high school by the time he is 14-years-old like I used to. I just want him to be happy. And school makes him unhappy.

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Caleb does go to school for 30-60 minutes a day for specials (art, music, gym) and therapy (speech, OT, social work). Caleb and I also regularly visit the Farmington Library and go to the Hands On Museum in Ann Arbor every Friday. At both places, he is able to have some autonomy and he can be “the leader.” He is able to interact with other kids as he pleases, but even just being around other people, he is learning to live in a world full of other people who expect certain behaviors (such as personal space). These are invaluable life lessons.

While Caleb is in school, I stay in the school office just in case there is a problem, but so far things have been going well. If he continues to behave while at school, that might actually give me enough free time to take the dogs to the dog park! I can smell freedom, and it smells like dogs.

I have a lot of spinning plates that I have had to put down in order to focus on Caleb. I don’t think he full appreciates how much of my freedom I have sacrificed, but I think one day he will. If not, I can always rely on my skills in Jewish guilt to torment him until I die. 🙂

 

When is it Worth the Fight?

My father gave me two pieces of advice that I will always remember. He sat me down before I went off to college and he told me: a) you may win the battle but lose the war, and b) never ever mix your drugs. (I’m serious. That was our entire conversation.)

When dealing with people, I tend to be results oriented; I tailor my behavior in order to get the desired outcome. For instance, if my goal is to be on good terms with a person, I will let things go because it isn’t worth the battle. When dealing with Caleb, being results oriented has been very helpful.

When I think about what I care about, it really boils down to me wanting Caleb to be healthy and happy. I also want him to grow up and be a good partner to someone he loves. So, I want to raise a healthy, happy gentleman.

How do I do this?
First of all, this is something that I thought about while Caleb was still in my belly. I never told him “no”; I always said, “no thank you.” I try to always use my manners with him and with other people so that I am modeling the kind of behavior I want him to emulate (see: Bandura). Caleb doesn’t think about being polite – it just comes naturally to him because we have conditioned him to use his manners.

Setting Caleb up for success is something that is constantly on my mind. This involves identifying and removing obstacles that can negatively affect Caleb’s goals. One way we do this is by buying Caleb pants that have a stretchy waistband because he has trouble unbuttoning his pants when he needs to use the potty. Or we transition to the family bed 45 minutes before bedtime, so we are getting in the mood for sleep.

But what happens when I cannot control the situation? What happens when Caleb is demanding something that I don’t want him to do or have? One of my main methods is a twist on The Passionometer Protocol. Basically, if Caleb wants something more than I don’t want it, then I give in. Exceptions to this rule is when Behaviorism comes into play. If Caleb is acting out and then I let him have his way, I am teaching him that in order to get his way, he can just throw a fit. It is so important to watch for unintended consequences when using positive reinforcement.

This weekend we are having a garage sale. This is very difficult for Caleb as he feels a true emotional connection to everything he owns. He even wants to keep clothes that he grew out of years ago. I have to figure out a way to stay firm and expose Caleb to some of the these parts of life that will be difficult for him, but also not push him off the cliff into Meltdown Land. I have let him take 5 or 6 small toys back, but I also said “no” to quite a bit. Caleb is exhausted because this process is mentally taxing for Caleb. I need to remember that and set him up for success by making sure he goes to the potty every 45 minutes, eating and drinking, and trying to not put one more piece of straw on that camel’s back.

Sometimes the battle is not with Caleb; sometimes it is for him. I have to constantly butt heads with our school, Lanigan Elementary in Farmington Schools. His special needs coordinator is super nice, but the principal and I do not get along. Lanigan does not have an ASD classroom; I refused to have Caleb go to a different elementary school because he has the right to go to school with his neighbors and friends. I finally had to send a letter to Lanigan cc’ed  to the superintendent office asking for them to test Caleb across all academics. Caleb is at a 3rd grade level in math and reading. Caleb also has anxiety, and just the idea of the tests makes him nervous. Caleb says that he will not take the test without me next to him. The superintendent’s office said that I could be in the building but not next to him. Am I supposed to battle my child into taking a test or do I stand up for my child? I mean, obviously, I have to stand up for him.

Do I look forward to fights I have ahead? Not at all. I hate fighting. I hate tension. I’m the person that just wants to walk away from a fight. It is exhausting, emotionally and physically. But, I have to be a Mama Bear and protect my cub. When I talk to other parents of special needs children, I hear horror stories about schools not supporting them enough. So many special needs kids we know go to private schools, but truth be told, there is no way we have the money for that.

I really wish schools would change their way of thinking, but I’m not holding my breath. So, these next coming weeks, I will be looking into the law on Michigan education, specifically with special needs children. I have found that having facts is much more important than having a strongly held opinion. One more thing – I can be a hot head sometimes, but my husband is always cool as a cucumber. When I am nearing my boiling point, I tell my husband our code word, and he knows to take over. In order to truly be results oriented, I can’t go around pissing off administrators. I have to be an adult. I have to be mature so Caleb can be a child.

That said, I really really want to show up for our IEP meeting wearing a Xena outfit. 🙂