Teachable Moments

Homeschooling is not necessarily going as planned, but it has some amazing moments that would not have occurred if we just threw Caleb on to the conveyor belt of education.

First of all, Caleb mental health is a priority. He has good days and bad days, but he doesn’t know why. He doesn’t have the emotional intelligence to know what is causing him to feel upset; it could be emotional or physical, there is just no way to tell. Part of this disconnect is because Caleb is autistic. It is also because he is only 7 (he will be 8 in December). I think too often we treat our children like little adults, expecting them to be able to use rational thought like us. I am 33 years older than my son. I have to believe that in my 33 years of life, I have grown and learned a lot about myself. I am self-aware enough to be able to recognize if and why I am having a bad day. But then again, there are some days when I just feel punk, and I don’t know the origin.

Second of all, there are some amazing teachable moments going on inĀ  our household that are not just about emotional awareness.

We watch AumSum videos on YouTube and learn about Earth and the solar system in a fun way. It is animated, so there is both verbal and visual information being stored in Caleb’s brain. Caleb learns well from videos, so he remembers what he watches and we talk about it later.

Yesterday, while making dinner, Caleb sat on a stool next to the sink and watched me thaw and then wring dry from frozen spinach. We talked about the tiny bits of ice and why they were there. We talked about plants in general and photosynthesis. We talked about what plants need to survive, and how some plants grow in full sun, part sun, or full shade. We talked about sandy versus clay soil and the importance of a proper pH. We talked about how the plant expands with water and then when we squeeze all the water out, it shrivels up. We compared it to the expansion and constriction of railroad lines that we saw in another video.

Caleb didn’t stay with me the entire time I was cooking, but he had the mental ability to have an educational talk with me at 5:00pm. When he went to school full time, he had no energy for anything else expect dinner and bedtime, and of course, playing on his electronics.

Caleb goes downstairs and codes in either Scratch or in HTML on his own computer. He knows that it is similar to what Dad does for a living (he is a software developer), so he calls it “work.” “I’ll be ready to talk with you when I am done with work,” he will regularly say to me.

Yesterday, the three of us played Monopoly Junior (which I highly suggest. Lots of fun, fast paced, and takes maybe 15-20 minutes to complete) and Caleb had no problem waiting for his turn to play. He was a joy.

This morning, Caleb was not a joy. So, I called the school and told them that he wasn’t coming in for specials today (specials include art, music, and gym). I don’t have to worry about Caleb’s attendance and I can let Caleb grow up a bit before I put neurotypical expectations on him.

I have been thinking a lot about my degree in Instructional Technology and how it has only been a stepping stone for my learning how to teach Caleb. I want to challenge educational departments in college to start thinking about special needs kids in every aspect of schooling. We know so much about how the neurotypical brain works, but when it comes to autism, we throw our hands up in the air and let the Behaviorists take over.

There is room for cognition and constructivisim in the special needs education plan. After all, Caleb is already motivated to learn what he wants to learn and how he wants to learn it. He has proven that using his methods, he can still be ahead of the curve. My job is protect that intrinsic motivation while making sure that he is also learning core curriculum. Other than that, when it comes to Caleb’s education, I need to learn to listen to him and let him be in the driver’s seat.