Olde Orchard Pediatric Dentistry – A Review

Like most autistic kids, Caleb has always fought us on the tooth brushing. We tried when he was very young, but at that point, we had bigger battles to fight. We were trying to figure out why Caleb lost his language skills. Then came the onslaught of therapies, one after another after another. I was basically a chauffeur for my son and his many therapists. When I finally got home, my energy was dwindling, but still, we did even more therapy together. Families that are still in that circle of exhaustion have no time for precious teeth issues. I know it sounds crazy, but it is true; people who are on the outside looking in don’t understand the burnout that comes with autism.

Thankfully, Caleb is in a place mentally and socially that we can take care of his hygiene. That includes regular bathing (kinda regular), but also brushing his teeth and hair, and cleaning and moisturizing his face twice a day. Caleb has keratosis pilaris, so we use a Burt’s Bee’s facial cleanser and we are just now trying a new serum: Serious Serum.

When we first started brushing Caleb’s teeth, we noticed there was blood in his spit. We checked out his mouth, and yup, he needed a visit to the dentist. His pediatrician suggested we go to Olde Orchard Pediatric Dentistry, and I am so glad that we did.

When you first enter the building, you notice how airy the waiting area is, with a domed ceiling and tons of natural light streaming in. In the middle were these large tree booths that were comfortable, but also gorgeous.

To the right was a smaller waiting room with just chairs and books. To the left was another small waiting room, but this one had a large flat screen television mounted on the wall, interactive toys, and Duplos, as well as more children’s books. Everything was clean and well taken care of.

Caleb had a meltdown the whole ride to the dentist, and then while we were inside the waiting room. The staff didn’t bat an eye – they deal with autistic children on a regular basis and know how to deal with the kids. The staff offered help when I was at the desk, but they let us deal with Caleb until we asked for help. It can be tricky for people to know what to do, but they were really good about knowing when they had an opportunity to help; when the receptionist heard that Caleb loved My Little Pony, she jumped up and put the My Little Pony movie on the television.

Caleb was still crying and whining as we were greeted by the dentist’s assistant and led down the hallway. I have never seen a prettier hallway. Seriously, they even had beautiful wooden tree cutouts with the room numbers on them. Each room has two doors, one for us, and then a slightly smaller door that the assistant and slip in and out of.

We were greeted by Dr. Maxwell, and she was totally chill. She knew how to talk to my husband and me and then how to talk differently to Caleb. She let him touch almost everything, and explained what she was doing as she was doing it. Within minutes, a previously scared and crying Caleb was happily lying down with his mouth open while Dr. Maxwell did her exam.

First of all, they are gentle. Even better: they are super fast. Dr. Maxwell knew how much to get done in a single session in order for Caleb to have a somewhat enjoyable experience; the last thing we want is for Caleb to hate the dentist and dig his heels in even farther.

Not a problem.
Caleb actually asked to stay. He didn’t want to leave the dentist.

Yes, Caleb has cavities, but I didn’t feel judged. I feel guilty, of course, but I also know that I am a good mother and I try really, really hard. Like, really hard. I also didn’t realize how easily Caleb can get cavities; my teeth have extra enamel on them so while they are a little yellow, I have never had a cavity in my life. My husband, however, has worked hard to keep his teeth in good condition, but he has cavities as well.

Dr. Maxwell created a schedule for us in order to come in so that Caleb can have his teeth treated. We opted for 4 short visits using Nitrous Oxide so that Caleb doesn’t feel pain and is more compliant.

After Dr. Maxwell finished her evaluation, Caleb was able to pick out a gift. He chose a righteous mustache that made him look like Mario, so he was over the moon.

I am really thankful to have found a dentistry that knows how to take care of autistic children. I would recommend Olde Orchard to any child, autistic or not; there were plenty of neurotypical children around us.

Olde Orchard Pediatric Dentistry is located in Novi, Michigan, near the Sears at Twelve Oaks Mall.

*Note: I did ask for permission to take photographs of Caleb and Dr. Maxwell during his visit. I also asked if I could review them. They were very supportive, taking a minute to hide any patient data so that no HIPAA violations occurred. I did not receive any compensation for my review, nor was it swayed by anyone.

Michigan Autism Conference, October 11-12, 2018

I know that I said that I was taking a break from the blog because of personal issues, but I am just bursting with ideas.

I was recently in Kalamazoo, Michigan, for the Michigan Autism Conference, and I learned a lot.

First of all, I have learned that every field struggles with their own definition. If I have to listen to one more “what makes us a field” discussions, I am going to rip of my ears and beat someone with them.

At every conference, no matter the field, this comes up over and over again. For a field that is based in behaviorism, I find it odd that there aren’t some strict descriptive and prescriptive behavioral objectives that can be tracked and continually evaluated.

Secondly, everyone loves to talk about sex. It was a popular conversation topic when I was 16, and now at 39, it is still endlessly interesting. The BEST speaker was Dr. Stein on Sexual Expression. She was a very engaging speaker as well as extremely intelligent. She didn’t miss a beat during her presentation; it was obvious that she has worked in her field a long time.

I learned that I am engaging in behavior that will probably have negative consequences down the line. For instance, I have not properly established boundaries with my son. I use the bathroom with the door open. I have always done this because either I had to keep an eye on Caleb or he would have a meltdown if he were sequestered from me. Unfortunately, I have been confusing “closed door behavior” and “open door behavior.” Taking a bath, for instance, should be a “closed door behavior.” He should have privacy, but alas, my desire for his safety has put a hindrance on another part of his life.

I also need to give him the space and time to be alone with his body. He needs to learn about his body and what he finds appealing or rewarding. I mean, boys masturbate in utero, so why shouldn’t they be able to touch themselves when they are older and more self-aware.

Also, children identify with their chosen gender by ages 3-4. To me that is crazy that my son already knows if he feels like a boy or a girl. Also, biologically, women are bisexual. There are so many aspects of this particular domain that are overlooked because the conversation makes us feel uncomfortable. I mean, do any of us relish the idea of explain the birds and the bees to our children?

Thankfully, I have done one thing right: it is important to properly identify your child’s body parts and use the correct terminology: vulva, vagina, penis, and testicles. I have used clear and simple language to explain bodily functions, including po0ping, eating, and menstruation – why would sex be any different?

Thirdly, there is a need for autism advocates. It is not just the autistic children that need attention, it is the family of autistic children as well. The field has a really high turnover rate because while the field can be rewarding, it is also very difficult. It is important for ABA therapists to take time for themselves and be able to relax. This allows for a mentally healthy worker who is refreshed and ready to put in the work.

I learned about The Healing Haven. There they are doing some of what I would like to do. I want to teach parents how to play with their kids. I want to reach out to diverse communities who may not have the access to child care that other communities have. It may sound funny to have to teach people how to play, but not every culture values play. Growing up, my father would only play Connect 4 or Checkers with us – he had no idea how to be silly and play with us. He never got on the floor and rolled around with joy.

There are many parents who want to raise little ladies and gentlemen, and if it works for their family, than great! But, if it isn’t working, finding a new strategy for play as an adult can seem completely foreign. For the sake of autistic children, we need to stop worrying about whether or not they see an adult as an authority figure, and worry about the adult and child connecting on a deeper level. And that connection is best made through play.

The MAC was a fantastic experience, and I was able to go through the generosity of ASK Family Services which awarded me a scholarship for free entrance to the 2 day conference. I have more thoughts, but for now, I’m thinking about Lloyd Rieber at University of Georgia and Serious Play.

 

Fun at the Detroit Zoo

As I have mentioned before, we keep a token economy in the house. Caleb can earn stars which he can use to buy books, he can earn money to save, and he can earn money to pay for trips. So far this summer, he has paid for a trip to Sea Life Aquarium and Lego Land, and most recently, a trip to the zoo with the ultimate experience, including Dinosauria. We even bought tickets that allowed us to feed a giraffe. Caleb was not very well behaved with the giraffe, but each one of us got a turn, and it was really cool.

Each trip, he has paid for himself, my husband, my husband’s parents, and me. Now, I have incredibly generous parents-in-law who like to pay for themselves (I ask them to just put the money back in Caleb’s trip fund).

In order to make each trip easier, Caleb (via me) has prepaid for the tickets and then set aside money to spend on gifts and stuff. Caleb is not really good at standing in line, so any obstacles we can remove ahead of time, the better.

This past Friday, all 5 of us went to the zoo, and like I mentioned before, we got the ultimate experience. I would totally recommend it.

First we saw the penguins and then the reptiles, and worked our way past the camels and zebras, and found the entrance to Dinosauria. It was super freaking cool. The dinosaurs moved and made noises. There were not just adult dinosaurs, but whole families or packs. Lots of adorable little babies hatching out of eggs and such. I also got spit on right on my crotch, so it looked like I peed myself – it was pretty funny.

We saw lemurs, a beautiful lion, a grizzly bear, and seals.

Everyone at the zoo was very kind; we have been to the Detroit Zoo since Caleb was a baby, and we have always had a wonderful time. The workers there are incredibly understanding when it comes to Caleb’s behavior. I have never had a negative experience with a single zoo worker. That is another reason why it is worth the expense.

I have to admit, my phone died about halfway through our 4 hour tour (yes, 4 hours. Yes, I was exhausted.) because I was so busy catching pokemon and spinning pokestops. I caught about 25 squirtles. I know, I know, so silly, but it is something Caleb and I were able to focus on when he was getting tired. Plus, fine, I like it too. Fine. I’ll admit it. I like pokemon. Anyway…

We decided to not to take the train from the Africa stop all the way down to the exit because we wanted to stop at the experience center; our tickets allowed us entrance to a 4D movie or a simulation ride. We got there right at 1pm, right as the sea monster 4D movie was about to begin. I have to say, it was fun. Plus, Caleb sat through the entire 15 minutes, which is a pretty big deal. He was super tired, near tears, but sat through a short movie. (btw, we passed a family that was really tired but didn’t have the money to buy train tickets, so we gave them ours. We all were so happy that we could help someone else and that happiness gave us a little extra energy to get through the rest of the trip.)

4 hours was too long for Caleb and he was pretty miserable on the way out. He had to be carried for a while and tears were streaming down his face. We offered to take him to the gift shop; I offered him $50 that he could spend either at the shop or on anything else he wanted. He asked for some candy (I just paid for it); when I suggested he use the rest of his money to pay for the interactive globe he has been wanting for months, he instantly jumped at the chance. Again, here is Caleb, exhausted and overstimulated and he is making wise choices. I was super proud. Still am.

Overall, the 5 of us going to the zoo was about $150. This is definitely not something that we can afford every month; that said, I feel like we got our money’s worth out of the experience. We did bring all our own food and drinks, which makes a huge difference money-wise.

We had such a good time, we are looking into getting a zoo membership.
5/5 stars!

The Best Gf/Cf Cookies

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The best chocolate chip cookies, hands down, are the Kinnikinnick cookies. These cookies are a lot like the Chips Ahoy! cookies I grew up with. They are relatively small, which is great for young kids. They are a hard cookie; if you prefer a softer cookie, Live G Free has some snickerdoodles and double chocolate cookies that are also delicious. Glutino cookies typically are not casein-free, so always always always read the labels.

In addition to the chocolate chip cookies, we also love the Kinnikinnick animal crackers and sandwich cookies. Pretty much anything by Kinnikinnick is delicious.

Happy snacking!

Gluten-free Pasta

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When it comes to gluten-free pasta, it has improved a lot over the past couple years. For a while, we depended on Trader Joe’s rice pasta and their rice/quinoa blend. We tried various Whole Foods brands, but the pasta was always gummy and didn’t taste very good.

In walks Barilla. Oh my, what a difference! The pasta tastes almost like normal wheat pasta; it is soft but still al dente. There are various types of gluten-free Barilla pasta, including spaghetti, rotini, penne, elbows, and fettuccine.